College of Behavioral & Community Sciences

SRI@FMHI

An intensive program for undergraduates interested in mental health research

Application Deadline is March 7, 2014

Student Researchers The Florida Mental Health Institute (FMHI) at the University of South Florida is dedicated to research and education related to mental illness and related disorders. FMHI invites undergraduate students to apply for a highly selective Summer Research Institute.

SRI@FMHI

The SRI@FMHI is designed for students interested in building their research skills within the context of mental health to help them prepare for a Senior Thesis and/or graduate school.

Dates:

The SRI@FMHI is a ten week summer program. The dates for the 2014 SRI@FMHI are May 29th, 2014 through August 6th, 2014.

Program Structure:

The SRI@FMHI consists of four components: an independent research project conducted with guidance from a distinguished faculty mentor; research seminars; professional development seminars; and skill-building workshops. The research seminars will complement the research that students are conducting with their faculty mentors. Throughout the ten week period, students will work intensively with faculty mentors on their research projects. In addition, students will gain experience with research ethics, IRB practices, and will participate in a community rotation to gain experience with mental health services in an area related to their research project.

Students will be required to write a research report describing their research project, present the report at a Research Symposium and Poster Session, and submit the completed paper for consideration at an Undergraduate Research Conference or Symposium. Because of the intensity of the summer program, students must participate on a full-time basis and may not be employed or attend other classes during the ten-week program.

Student Application and Selection Process:

Applications must be received no later than March 7, 2014. Students accepted to the program should be notified by March 25, 2014.

Up to 12 students will be selected for the SRI@FMHI. Because each SRI Scholar will be matched with a faculty mentor, primary consideration will be given to those applicants whose area of interest is closely aligned with the expertise of a faculty member who is available to provide mentorship during the summer. Typically, students will be considered for the program if they have begun coursework in their academic major, completed a minimum of 60 hours of college coursework, and have an expected graduation date no earlier than December, 2014. Priority will be given to students who are within 7-15 months of graduation. Courses in statistics and research methodology are required to be eligible. The application form may be obtained at http://www.cbcs.usf.edu/research/sri/sriapplication.cfm or by contacting An official transcript from your university as well as a letter of reference from a faculty member who is familiar with your academic performance is required.

Student Support:

All students who are accepted for the program will receive the following benefits as part of the REU:

Students are responsible for paying for the cost of housing and food. On-campus housing is available on the USF campus.

Among the Potential Faculty Mentors:

Student researcher with faculty mentor

Dr. Mary Armstrong conducts research on children with serious mental health problems, out-of-home treatment for children, and the financing of children's mental health services.

Dr. Roger Boothroyd specializes in measurement, evaluation, and research design and applies these skills to research investigating access to and quality of care of individuals receiving services through Medicaid-funded mental health programs.

Dr. Kya Conner conducts research focusing on mitigating the impact of disparities in mental health service utilization, access, and treatment facing African American elders.

Dr. Bryanna Fox conducts research on Psychological and Developmental Criminology, with the goal of identifying potential risk factors for criminal and antisocial behavior, and developing useful practices for the identification, prevention, and evaluation of offenders with these psychological and developmental risk factors.

Dr. Kathleen Moore conducts research focusing on co-occurring mental health and substance abuse disorders and homelessness among persons with mental health problems.

Dr. John Robst , a health economist, is currently working on a project assessing family involvement in out-of-home care placements of children with serious emotional and behavioral disorders.

Dr. Allison Salloum conducts research on childhood trauma, childhood anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorders in young children.

Dr. Larry Schonfeld conducts research on depression, substance misuse, behavior problems in long term care with a focus on populations older adults, veterans, individuals with serious mental illness, and college students.

Dr. Lynn Wecker , a neuropsychopharmacologist in the USF College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, conducts laboratory bench research that seeks to understand how brain chemistry is related to schizophrenia, depression, addictive behaviors, and other conditions.

AND MORE: Students with a particular research interest should review the departmental webpages of the College of Behavioral & Community Sciences website to determine if faculty are conducting research in a similar or related area. If you are interested in neuroscience research, please review the projects on the Neuropsychopharmacology website.

Summer Institute Alumni:

FMHI has previously conducted Summer Research Institutes for undergraduates through funding from the National Science Foundation. Students from those programs have successfully published their research and presented their work at conferences. One goal of the SRI@FMHI is to help students prepare research publications and presentations.

Sponsors:

Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute USF College of Behavioral & Community Sciences The National Institute of Mental Health
Student researchers

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